When the parts of the sum are greater than the whole : assessing the peak-and-end-theory for a heterogeneous, multi-episodic tourism experience

Wim Strijbosch, Ondrej Mitas, T. van Blaricum, O. Vugts, C. Govers, Moniek Hover, John P.T.M. Gelissen, Marcel Bastiaansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Emotions are a key component of tourism experiences, as emotions make experiences more valued and more memorable. Peak-and-end-theory states that overall experience evaluations are best predicted by the emotions at the most intense and final moments of an experience. Peak-and-end-theory has mostly been studied for relatively simple experiences. Recent insights suggest that peak-and-end-theory does not necessarily hold for tourism experiences, which tend to be more heterogeneous and multi-episodic in nature. Through the novel approach of using electrophysiological measures in combination with experience reconstruction, the applicability of the peak-and-end-theory to the field of tourism is addressed by studying a musical theatre show in a theme park resort. Findings indicate that for a multi-episodic tourism experience, hypotheses from the peak-and-end-theory are rejected for the experience as a whole, but supported for individual episodes within the experience. Furthermore, it is shown that electrophysiology sheds a new light on the temporal dynamics of experience
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
JournalJournal of Destination Marketing & Management
Volume20
Issue numberJune 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • peak-and-end-theory
  • experience
  • emotions
  • physiology
  • skin con

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